Ahlonia Isle Random Encounters

This resource is a list of Random Encounters that can be generated for overland travel through the lands of Ahlonia intended for use by a Director in whatever way he sees fit. Certain results on this table may not be appropriate to the region being traversed, or the story being told, and so these are merely a resource to be used or not as a Director wishes. Randomization is not essential, nor is abiding by any result. It is published with the sole intention of providing a tool to save the Director time, and allow him to introduce flavour and vitality to the world that is outside of the scope of the story, that is tailored to the tone of the setting. To randomly generate an event the Director should roll 1d100 and consult the entries below for a corresponding number, or choose an event from this list completely at his own discretion. It is suggested that a random event, if in use, be rolled once a week, however this table will function just as well daily if players are travelling fast, with perhaps a greater likelihood of a 'no event' result (we recommend a 25% chance of a roll on this table each day). Players should be in no way obligated to involve themselves in any event (except where this is unavoidable) and should be allowed to react in whatever way they choose, but some suggestions for player reactions and their outcomes are included with each event.

01-26 No Event

Nothing out of the ordinary happens, the characters' day passes as expected.

27 Ambush

While passing through a route with an overlook, such as a ravine, alleyway, steep sided valley or clearing, the characters come upon an ambush. There will usually be a trap on the way through, and armed men hidden overlooking the route with ranged weapons. Roll on the three tables below to randomize the particulars of the ambush. Ambushers are always average examples of their race and profession.
d6 roll

attacker

d6 roll

number of attackers

d6 roll

trap

d6 roll

weapon
1

Bandits

1

1

1

Landslide

1

Rocks and Improvised Weapons
2

Bandits

2

1d3

2

Tripwire

2

Rocks and Improvised Weapons
3

Vagrants

3

1d6

3

Hobbling Trap

3

Nets
4

Goblyns

4

1d6

4

Spiked Pit

4

Short Bows
5

Slavers

5

1d10

5

Pit

5

Short Bows
6

A Giant*

6

2d6

6

Pit

6

Javelin
*Giants are rare indeed, take care not to overuse them. Generally only a single giant should be encountered, and only in Giant territory.

The ambushers will usually not be willing to part with their lives in such an encounter, ideally wanting characters to give up and either hand over their valuables or become prisoners. If too many of them start getting badly hurt or dying, or the situation seems to go against them they will make a run for it. Usually they have a nearby encampment, and if the ambushers are beaten soundly enough they may abandon all of the gear there. There is never much of interest there, but things like canvas shelters, food, a built fire and fresh water could usually be expected. Perhaps a mule and wagon for large groups, or other victims in the case of Slavers. Bandits and slavers could be landsmen or goblyns depending on where they are encountered.

28-30 Bad Map

Often on Ahlonia roads are poorly marked, even more poorly kept, and the best routes take characters down games trails or through fields where heavy traffic couldn't go. Very often then characters must rely on the directions of locals or a map. When this event is generated it means that the direction or map the characters have been given are wrong, and they are lost. They could backtrack and lose time or they can try to find their way for themselves if they have any appropriate orienteering skills. Of they could of course just wander around aimlessly until they run into someone to ask. If the characters backtrack it will take 1d3 days to pick up the trail unless they reach somewhere to ask directions first. If they just wander aimlessly it will take 2d6 days to find someone who can give them directions or correct their map.

If this seems like an unlikely event, because characters are in a highly developed region, or because they know the area well then consider this result a 'No Event' instead.

31-35 Bad Provisions

Sometimes the provisions you buy for a trip aren't what they were sold as, or don't last as long as planned. This event occurs when the characters sit down for a meal from their packs. They find that some of their food, or water has gone bad and is uneatable! Each character loses 2d6-1 days worth of provisions that were obtained from a single source (including their own hunting or gathering). If this results in them running out of food they will need to do something about this in a hurry.

If characters are stopping at a settlement to purchase food this event might mean that their purchase was bad, in which case they have a gripe with the vendor. Otherwise it can be disregarded as a 'No Event' result.

36-37 Beggar

The characters encounter 1d10-4 (minimum 1) beggars on the side of the route. Usually these poor souls are crippled, impoverished and starving, looking for a scrap of food or a coin to help them survive. The Director should roll 1d10, on a 1-6 the beggars are cripples, on a 7-9 they are merely destitute and on a 0 they are con men merely pretending to be crippled. Of course this may not be obvious to the characters. Heroic characters may try to help, giving up food or buying a meal, while no one should blame a character for merely walking by. A man would quickly starve himself if he fed every beggar he saw.

If the characters are in the wild, or somewhere unpopulated the beggars might be wandering lepers, seeking alms. But no wise character would approach the sick for fear for his own life, and characters genuinely feeling charitable should be warned that they will need to roll a constitution check against whatever disease they have to avoid contracting it. Roll on the table below to determine what the lepers have. If it is not airborne then a test is only required for physical contact, otherwise close proximity is enough to warrant a test. lepers will usually be marked by mouths bound in bandage as well as seeming weak and pale, but some may have reasons to disguise their ailment.
d6 roll

disease

difficulty to resist

airborne

difficulty to treat
1

Seasonal Plague

25

yes

41
2

Seasonal Plague

28

yes

41
3

Rotting Sickness

30

no

40
4

Shivering Sickness

26

yes

38
5

Shivering Sickness

30

yes

42
6

Bloody Flux

33

no

55

38 Brawl

The characters are witness to a brawl. Perhaps there is a disagreement between a merchant and customer, perhaps a passer by accuses a stranger of robbing him, perhaps a drunk simply takes a dislike to one or all of the characters. Whatever the cause the characters are up for a bit of fisticuffs. No one is really out to kill anyone, and if they are not involved the characters are more than welcome to just walk on by. In a populated or civilized area 1d6 of the local constabulary will arrive in 2d6-2 minutes (a result of 0 meaning someone is already on hand) and if the characters have involved themselves there may be some legal issues. If weapons are drawn and things get out of hand all but the most foolhardy drunk will beat a quick retreat. Anyone involved in the brawl should be an average example of their profession, and profession will usually be determined by the location. In the wilds travelers may be arguing over a wagon run off the road by a careless traveler spooking an animal, or it might just as well be two medium to large wild animals competing over territory. Two Samsuns clashing in the Roughlands would certainly be an obstacle to be avoided.

39 Brigands

A band of men intent on robbing the characters approach. Unlike the Ambush event, encountering brigands usually means that the offenders attack opportunistically rather than in a planned attack. Brigands will usually try to unobtrusively close in on and surround their marks before threatening them. They have little taste for a fight, wanting characters instead to surrender at sword point, and will usually try to have characters disarm at sword point, however most robbers don't want to risk being followed or identified, and often kill their victims after they are rendered helpless. If it comes down to a fair fight the brigands will try to escape. Brigands only attack when they think they have the advantage, so this event will usually produce one brigand who is an average example of his race and class per character plus 1d6 additional brigands. Alternatively Directors could use the table under the 'Ambush' event to generate more random sets of brigands, using the random number of attackers setting to generate the number of additional brigands on top of the number of characters present.

40 Cave

The characters pass close by a cave or other natural sheltered area close to the end of their day. This would be an ideal place to stop and rest for the evening, but often one group of travellers find that they are not the first passers by to have that idea. If the characters want to stop for the night in the cave there is plenty of room for any mounts they have with them (within reason) and if they find the cave abandoned they will get a head start the next day from not having to take down their camp, and avoid any ill effects from weather that might be effecting the journey. However when they investigate roll 1d100 and consult the table below to see if there are any other inhabitants.
d100 roll

inhabitant
01-70

none
71-81

large predatory animal
82-87

other travelers (welcoming)
88-90

other travelers (unwelcoming)
91-97

vagrants
98-99

brigands
00

dead leper!
Welcoming travellers will invite the characters to join them, and may be able to trade for a useful service, or be persuaded to share a drink. Unwelcoming travellers have arrived first, and aren't keen to share. Vagrants will be afraid that the characters represent local law enforcement, and may react hostilely or flee depending on how the characters behave towards them. Brigands will likely fight when cornered, though they may try to trick the characters into joining them, then murder them in the night. A dead leper means that a poor soul has crawled in here to die. Roll on the table for diseases under the 'Beggar' event to determine what the leper had, and then have any characters exposed roll to avoid contracting the disease. The difficulty to resist any airborne disease is always 5 less than listed as the source of contagion is dead, and thus not breathing.

41 Escaped Prisoner

This encounter could go down one of two ways. In the first instance the characters encounter a law enforcement official, be it a watchman or soldier, who is injured but conscious. He tells them that a criminal he captured caught him by surprise, overpowered him and fled. The offender is still in manacles and fleeing, probably into the wild. He can say the direction, and that his charge has only minutes head start. Characters can go after the prisoner, an average example of his profession and race, or particularly unscrupulous individuals could just rob or kill the injured lawman. Or they can just say they're in too much of a hurry and walk by.

Alternatively the characters might encounter the fleeing prisoner before the lawman. In this situation the prisoner might be allowed an initiative and/or wisdom check to see if he has his wits about it, and may try to lie about escaping bandits or similar, and beg the characters to untie him. Of course if they do they will still meet the lawman a little way down the road, and realize their folly.

In either situation characters recapturing the prisoner will usually receive a monetary reward for their assistance when they deliver him back. Of course if he's dead or dying when they do so they may well find themselves accused of a crime unless they can explain themselves smartly. If the lawman wanted him dead he wouldn't've gone to the trouble of tying him up after all.

42-45 Famine

The characters enter an area struck by a famine. While in the region they will not be able to purchase food, or food will be purchased at 1d3+1 times the normal price. Difficulties for hunting and foraging for food will all be increased 10%, and particularly noble characters might be inclined to give up some of their provisions to the locals - or find that they can turn a good profit selling them. The famine-struck area will stretch for the next 1d6 days of travel. Characters can, of course, backtrack to restock if they wish, but they will probably find that all the local traders are either low on stock, or cashing in on the crisis.

If the characters are in an uninhabited area simply impose the listed penalty to hunting and foraging for the next 1d6 days travel.

46-48 Festival

The characters stumble on a settlement in the grips of a local festival, and are invited to stay for the festivities. Particularly personable or famous characters (those with a beauty or charm of 20 or above, or with fame of 5 or above) may be invited to participate free of charge, offered drinks and food and lodgings as they desire. Of course characters overdoing the festivities will find themselves severely waylaid in the morning, by throbbing heads, tired eyes and full bellies. Many traders will also be in town for the festivities, and a number of things will be able to be bought that may not be otherwise available.

In uninhabited areas treat this result as a 'No Event'.

49-50 Fire

Wildfires are common enough in summer, and campfires and torches sometimes get out of hand. Whatever the cause this event involves the characters coming across an already well established and moderately large fire. It might be a field, a copse of trees or a house, but whatever the victim the flames have engulfed it and are raging and threatening to spread. In a wilderness area it is enough to simply get away and hunt for an alternate route, but in a populated area the decent thing to do would be to help bucket water from the well or the stream onto the fire and help quench it. Of course this is by no means an obligation, but characters who stroll by while the town is trying to save a building are likely to find prices increased and lodgings closed to them. Those who help meanwhile are likely to find food and beds gratefully free of charge.

51-52 Flood

The characters come upon an area suffering from severe flooding. Perhaps a river has burst its banks, or a dam has broken, or heavy rain has choked the lowlands with water. Whatever the case it will be slow going for the next d3 days of travel, and bodies of water crossed in this time will prove impassable. The terrain becomes swamp for the purposes of travelling through it, and on the whole it might be easier to select an alternate route. The flooding will last for 1d3 weeks if characters want to wait it out.

In arid regions like the Roughlands treat this result as 'No Event'.

53 Fool's Gold

Occasionally coin is not what it seems to be. Counterfeiting is not common in Ahlonia, but nor is it unknown. Don't tell the characters anything now, but the next time they try to buy something with coin (if they have any) the trader will point out that 2d6 of their coins are counterfeit, cut with an impurity, or have been shave underweight, and he won't accept them. Pick a character at random, or target the wealthiest. It's hard to know what to do with worthless coins, but they could keep trying to pass them off - someone's bound to not be paying enough attention eventually.

54-58 Glorious Conditions

The weather is glorious, sun beaming down with just enough breeze to keep the air crisp and pleasant, and as if that weren't enough the characters pass by a babbling brook, a cool glade, a pleasant pool or some other picturesque geographic feature. It's certainly not compulsory, but if the characters aren't in a hurry why shouldn't they stop and enjoy the day, and give them a chance to interact with one another. As the Director you can lead the conversation, but generally just let the players character develop.

59-61 Lame

Usually when travelling any great distance characters will employ a beast of burden either to ride or carry goods, usually a hoofed animal like a mule or ox, but more rarely a horse. When this event is generated it's this poor beast's turn to have some problems.Perhaps the animal has thrown a shoe, or has a nasty stone-bruise, or has pulled a muscle, but whatever the case it will likely want to stop altogether, and be unwilling to move any faster than half it's walking speed until something is done to rectify the situation.

If the characters aren't accompanied by a beast then perhaps one character's boots fall apart, or perhaps one has a nasty fall and is allowed the usual tests to avoid injury - injury to the legs or feet that will likely slow proceedings down.

62-66 Lost

In the 'Bad Map' event the characters had someone else to blame, but in this event they have a pretty good chance of getting themselves lost. Have the characters make an orienteering test of some kind against a middling to high difficulty depending on the familiarity of the terrain. Success might mean that they realize that they are about to take the wrong course just as they do so, while failure by one to seven points means that the characters are that many days off course. Failure by more than that margin (i.e. 8 or more) means that the characters still haven't realized that they are lost! Have them check for every day travelled from now on, reducing the difficulty and increasing the number of days to restore their original course by 1 for every additional failure. If things are just getting ridiculous you'll need to give them hints like the chance to ask a stranger the way, or a road marker - or even arriving back at the last settlement that they left!

67 Massacre

The characters come upon a grisly scene. Dead bodies lie strewn about the path, the remains suggest a violent end befell them. There are 2d6+1 bodies total, as well as a wagon, now bereft of it's goods and a slaughtered oxen still hitched to it. In addition, if the characters are local to the area roll a d100. On a 91-99 they are acquainted with the victims, and on a 00 they are close friends or family. Characters wanting to try to pursue the perpetrators of such a heinous crime, of course, may. The Director can utilize the table under the 'Ambush' event to generate a band of attackers - though slavers seem unlikely given the dead. Of course characters will have to track the attackers. They are usually nearby in a camp similar to that described in the 'Ambush' event, and will most likely have a sentry watching the approach from the road if their number exceeds 4.

68-69 Militia

Passing through a settlement the characters are approached by a band of men in rough uniform. The leader, a professional warrior sort, wants them to join the local militia for a period anywhere from a few days to a few months. Of course it is his legal right to demand that able bodied men (and only men) serve in this manner, and the job does pay, but this probably won't suit the characters. If it does, fine, there is a 50% chance of a roll on this table every day of their service, accepting only results that are appropriate to militia work, with any inappropriate result being substituted with 'Brawl' (1-3 on a d6) or 'No Event' (4-5 on a d6). If not this could go one of several ways. Either characters can bribe their way out of service (this will require tests and role playing, but generally speaking a handful of silver is usually enough to turn any watchman's head) or utilize any authority and/or fame they have, or they can simply run for it - a crime yes, but a minor one. Even if caught they'll just spend a few days in the local lockup and then a couple more in the stocks - or at worst earn a public lashing, and then be allowed on their way.

70 Minstrel

The characters come upon a travelling minstrel. If you feel the need to add detail you can generate a few peculiarities about the man on the table below, but generally only do this if the characters express an interest. At first the minstrel will engage them and play for a few coins, but there are a few reasons that he might be useful to them. First and foremost a minstrel is a traveller and, outside territory where his guild protects him, a vagrant. Earning his freedom with song and music and dance the minstrel is one of the best travelled men in all of Ahlonia, and is a rich source of rumour from the surrounding area, making him rich territory for characters seeking something. Of course, he'll want a coin or two for his trouble. Second he can be commissioned to spread word of the characters' exploits in song should they so desire. In this case the price will be greater, and time will have to be spent relating (and embellishing) their tale, but if he is any good then the characters may find that their fame is effectively a point higher in the immediate area.

d6 roll

talent

style

personality

instrument

traveling
1

Awful (skill 1)

Jigs

Foppish

Lute

North
2

Poor (skill 2)

Sonnets

Earnest

Mandolin

South
3

Average (skill 3)

Bawdy

Lurid

Pipes

East
4

Average (skill 3)

Knee Slapping

Comedic

Drum

West
5

Fine (skill 4)

Formal

Professional

Harp

Same as Characters
6

Excellent (skill 5)

Epics

Demure

Bells

Opposite to Characters

71-72 Overslept

The next time that the characters stop to rest they will oversleep by 1d6 hours. If they post a sentry this is less likely, but have the final watch take a Will test vs. 30 to stay awake, if he does disregard this event. If not the characters oversleep as above. If they employ some other method of waking them such as sleeping in a barn or an inn where they are likely to be woken either invent some pretext for the omission or else hold off this event until it next seems more likely.

73 Cutpurse

The characters are bumped into by a lanky youth who tries to pick their pockets. Roll 1d6, on a 1-4 the youth is merely an Average Cutpurse, but on a 5-6 he is an Elite Cutpurse. In either case he will target the most overtly wealthy character, and attempt to make off with whatever he can palm from their person by bumping into them. To assuage characters suspicion present them with another situation first to distract them, such as a hawker in a market or a commotion that sends several people running in their direction to give the Cutpurse and opening. Obviously Perception vs. Sleight of Hand is in order. After he has something or if he is caught in the act the youth will make good his escape at either a casual but brisk pace, or an all out sprint, and will abandon his prize if pursuit seems likely to catch up. If you catch a man who has robbed you and want to rough him up a little - or even a lot - no one really cares. The youth is a known criminal.

74-75 Pilgrims

The characters come upon a group of 2d6 pilgrims led by a junior priest heading to or from a local place of holy significance. The priest is really the only person in the group valuable to characters - able to offer prayers, council, or 50% of the time a palm reading to any character in need of such services. If he is not familiar with palmistry (and only if not ) then there is a further 50% chance that he knows some herb lore and healing - equivalent to skill level of 1 or 2. There is also a 50% chance that the pilgrims are travelling the same way as the characters, and would welcome the company of anyone who seems trustworthy. After all - there is safety in numbers!

76-78 Plague

The characters begin to see the signs that they are travelling through a region cursed with plague! Use the table provided under the 'Beggars' event to determine what kind of plague they are facing, and the difficulty to avoid it. For every day that they are in a semi-civilized area the characters must test to avoid contracting plague. An additional test is required if they purchase any food or water in the region. The infected area takes 1d6 days to pass through on foot, or double that to skirt around. Of course if any of the characters has knowledge of healing the heroic thing might be to tend to the ailing for a few days.

79-80 Rock Fall

Traversing an area of rough terrain the characters come upon a collapsed bank of rock or heavy clay while passing through a steep valley that has totally blocked the way. They can try to clear it - requiring 1d6 hours, or skirt around requiring 1d3 hours. In either case if they are pursued or pursuing someone this delay could be costly. Otherwise use this as an opportunity to allow the characters to interact with one another in character for a bit, perhaps urge certain points of conversation on the trip around. It always pays to throw a nothing-event like this at players to allow them to develop their own narratives a little better.

81 Runaway

Vagrancy is a crime in landsman Ahlonia, and slavery is legal in old Sigard and amongst the goblyns. In this event characters run across a fleeing individual who is a recent escapee of one of these systems. Of course, unless they have some stake in the slavery or vagrancy laws, such as being expected to uphold them as agents of the law, they will most likely just let the hapless individual go by. His pursuers are in eye shot just down the way after all. Noble characters might be willing to intercede, but players should be reminded that this is the law, and no matter what their own stance, for the characters this is tantamount to sheltering a thief. Of course if the characters are vagrants themselves - which is likely - they may have a certain empathy. The other option would be to turn the offender in to his pursuers, but this would gain them little more than the thanks of his masters. It seemed likely the fleeing individual would be caught, and all the characters will have really done is saved his pursuers some time. But they may be grateful to the tune of a drink or some frank information if this is so desired.

82 Shrine

The characters come upon a roadside shrine or place of holy significance. Roll 1d6 to determine the shrine's devotion. On a 1 it is a yurgish shrine, on a 2-5 it is diounic and on a 6 the characters have stumbled upon a sacred grunite site. In landsman lands yurgish shrines might be unlikely but in the Forest Kingdom they will likely be destroyed and desecrated. Similarly Grunite sites will either be well hidden or only recognizable to an initiate of the cult. If the characters are members of the religion matching the shrine they should be expected to stop and pray. They can offer their usual prayers of devotion, pray for guidance, pray for a blessing or offer some other prayer of their own devising. Whatever they choose to pray for, test their Devoutness + Religion to see if their prayer is acknowledged. For more information on the results of prayer see the Word and Deed, but for a quick result grant a +1 bonus to any one statistic for the duration of the day for a successful prayer. Characters can keep praying as long as they like, but once a prayer has been answered no further boon will be granted that day.

83-88 Storm

Bad weather turns into an all out storm that hammers the region that the characters are moving through. Every day that they press on through the storm generate conditions from the table below. To see if the storm subsides the next day roll 1d6 at the end of every stormy day. After the first day the storm subsides on a 6+, on the next a 5+, then a 4+ and so on until the sixth day when it ends automatically.
1d6 roll

condition

wind direction
1

Heavy Rain

North
2

Thunder

South
3

Forked Lightning

East
4

High Winds

West
5

Flooding

With Characters
6

Landslides

Against Characters
Every day conditions are dark, windy and raining, in addition there are 1d6 additional conditions randomized from the table above. Characetrs will most likely be able to anticipate how many conditions before setting off by the severity of the storm, but tests will be required to anticipate which conditions the Director has generated. More information on all of these extreme weather conditions can be found in the Tome of Lore and in The Land sections of the rules, but the general points are that heavy rain makes conditions hazardous, roads are slippery, climbing is hard, mud is cloying and so on. Thunder frightens any animals the characters have with them, and also causes periods during which hearing tests will be severely penalized. Forked lightening always carries with it the threat, no matter how slim, or striking a character (usually near-fatally) remember that conventional physics do not necessarily apply to the behaviour of lightning in Allornus. High winds will make it near impossible to employ missiles, and difficult to even walk against them, and make campfires or tents an impossibility. 'Flooding' and 'Landslides' should be considered the same as the corresponding events on this list, with the exception that characters risk being caught when they occur instead of merely encountering them, meaning they may be swept away by water or buried in mud and rubble.

89 Traveling Peddler

The characters encounter a pedlar traveling in the opposite direction to them. They may want to take this opportunity to trade with him for a few things they need or want, be they supplies, or something even something that they were detouring to a town to get. Of course a traveling pedlar isn't as well stocked as a shop by any means. He has a small mule-drawn covered cart that serves as his store and home. To determine the kind of pedlar and quality of his goods roll three times on the table below.
d6 roll

goods

profession

range
1

Food and Drink

Average

no cart, just his pack
2

Utensils and Woodwork

Average

poor, going to restock
3

Furs, Skins and Leather

Average

average, a stocked cart
4

Clothing and Textiles

Average

average, a stocked cart
5

Tools and Metalwork

Average

full, recently restocked
6

Alchemical Potions and Herbs

Elite

special, he has something rare and unusual
If the pedlar's range comes up as special he will be keen to sell this item, and extol it's virtues, for the best price he can get. In addition you should roll again to determine the rest of his stock, re-rolling any further 6s. The rare item needn't fit with his other goods, and has been picked up for a song to be on sold, perhaps because it is stolen or because the original owner was in dire need of credit. Whatever the case it can be anything you dream up. Good examples might be particularly rich or finely made goods, exotic items from another race or region, or items that purport (often falsely) some modest magical ability such as a protective talisman or simple potion. When the goods determine potions and herbs roll an additional d6. On a 5-6 these are legitimate, but on a 1-4 the man is nothing more than a snake-oil salesman. Of course, the characters have no reason to be sceptical unless they have some experience in that field themselves.

90 Tremor

Fully fledged earthquakes in Allornus don't just happen for no reason. Powerful spirits with unknowable - but by no means random - motives are behind them. However little earth shakes are just the result of a spirit in a bad mood. In this event the characters experience such a shake. Now, the results of this could differ dramatically depending on where the characters are. In the open planes they'll most likely feel a little shudder, wait for it to stop and move on. But on a precarious mountain path, or a deep river valley, an ancient forest or even a tumble-down settlement things could be much more dire with houses, trees and rocks falling on them or blocking their way or worse still the path they are on giving way and taking them with it! When you generate this event don't be afraid to hold onto it until a dramatic time to spring it - but try not to be intentionally cruel, tempting as it is to have the quake strike when one of the characters is right at the top of a tree. Perhaps allow him a luck check, and if he succeeds delay it 'til he's in the clear, and if he fails go ahead and start rolling to drop him on his head.

91-93 Wagon Train

Overland oxen-drawn wagon trains are still the cheapest and most common way to move goods around Ahlonia, even along the coast. Characters will likely see a lot of them if they stick to civilized roads, but in this event the characters encounter one heading their way either coming up from behind or joining their route from an alternate one. Now, they could stop and ask questions such as directions or for news of the merchant running the train, and if they're diplomatic or especially threatening he will be only too happy to oblige. However characters who are astute may also ask to travel with the wagon train. Merchants usually hire guards at settlements if they need them, but characters travelling with a train are less likely to need to post sentries, and will usually get into and out of settlements unharnesses. Most settlements like travelling merchants, or rather they like the gold they bring with them. Merchants for their own part appreciate a bigger party because every extra man is one more person any prospective bandit or wild animal will have to think about tangling with if they're waiting along the road. So the partnership is often mutually beneficial. Of course, characters have to behave to continue to be welcome. At the next major landmark the wagons part with the characters in a different direction - unless the characters want to change their plans and stick with the train.

94 Which Road?

As in the other events regarding getting lost the characters sense of where they're going and what the correct route is is far from infallible, in this case they come to a point in their route where they have two clear options and their map or directions does not acknowledge more than one choice. Characters can choose to employ orienteering type skills to try to determine the correct route, or pick at random and leave it to chance. The latter option is best resolved with a Luck check. Particularly lucky characters might find the route that they chose was the wrong one, but had unexpected benefits such as proving to be a shortcut. Of course characters who choose the wrong route should not be told until they find themselves somewhere entirely opposite to where they thought that they would be. A certain lack or confirmation either way might encourage characters to keep making orienteering checks until they get a conclusive result one way or another. Remember that players should not be expected to be using a skill automatically unless they say so or the situation warrants it, and they will need to vocalize their desire. All the Director needs to impart is the level of difficulty and the associated bonuses and penalties to the check - not the actual numerical difficulty.

95-99 Wild Animals

The characters have attracted the attention of a local wild animal. Maybe it's mating season, and the animal is being territorial, perhaps it or they have been attracted by the smell of food, cooking or just being carried, or perhaps they simply intended to try to eat the characters. Whatever the case consult the region's Flora and Fauna list to see what kind of animal turns up, and then roll on the table below:
d6 roll

animal

attitude

number
1

small (rodent/insects)

Curious

1
2

medium grazer (goat)

Mischievous

1d3
3

large grazer (deer)

Aggressive

1d6
4

small predator (boar)

Hungry

1d6+2
5

medium predator (wolf)

Territorial

1d6+4
6

large predator (bear)

Shy

1d6+6
In the case of a small result bees and wasps are particularly common, however when randomizing their number this represents the number of small to medium swarms, rather than individual animals. Insects are seldom curious and never mischievous. Traditionally solitary animals such as bears should not be encountered randomly in unforeseeable numbers. perhaps two adults and two cubs might be the maximum in this case. Similarly pack or herd animals encountered alone are likely to not be far from their pack/herd.

00 Story Event

The Director is encouraged to occasionally break the flow of the story and throw in something that hurries along a new event or section unexpectedly, having the characters come across something or someone relevant to the story purely by chance, or have them discover a person or location that may become relevant later. We can't tell you what to do with this event, but there is a 1% chance of it coming up at best, so we do encourage Directors generating it to take a moment and go way off script. Will it mess with your carefully planned notes? Yes, but no more than players can. Not every outing goes down in the same three act structure. Take generating this as a sign from the RPG fairies to mix it up and do something unexpected and new - it might pay off, and even if it doesn't you can say you tried.

But if you really want to be a spoilsport and stick to your script then instead of just considering this a 'No Event', roll again. If you get it twice the universe is really trying to tell you something.