Kelorn Calendar

The Kelorn Calendar is a four-hundred-and-two day, sixteen month calendar common to most civilized races of the world, though the Irian Calendar and Drak Calendar both interpret the months slightly differently, and most immigrant landsmen cultures (that is those who have their own patron Divhi) devote months to the landsmen Divh over the old Divh. The only major deviation is the calendar used by the One True Faith, which is based around the moons' relationship to the constellation of the Overlord, rather than the seasons, but even the folk of Nardaan under the Faith use the Drak Calendar to track their years.

Spring
month Pasanir Marnir Eranir Paranir
association Fire Creator Earth Elissa
days 30 20 20 30
Summer
month Dahlnere Seranere Kafnere Lonere
association Air Sera Summer Solstice Light Makandar
days 30 20 1 20 30
Autumn
month Ananir Malanir Lunir Otenir
association Darkness Malakhi Water Othen
days 30 20 20 30
Winter
month Ganenere Danere Gunere Sumere
association Life Daak Winter Solstice Death Fate
days 30 20 1 20 30

Drak Calendar

Based on the Kelorn Calendar already in common use when the landsmen first came to Allornus, the four-hundred-and-two day Drak Calendar sees the months reamed, not for the Divh or elements as in the Kelorn one, but for the rituals and offerings required within those periods. Common to Maldaakore, the Drak Calendar has perhaps surprisingly remained in use in the Malorn lands of Nardaan, where they abhor all other aspects of their overlord culture. Some think of it as a reminder of their years in slavery, others admit scholarly laziness, but the Malorns of Nardaan seldom have cause to name the month anyway, since their only season is winter.

Irian Calendar

The Irian Calendar is common to Iria, Ralstaa, and Ahlonia. It has a four-hundred-and-two day year, corresponding almost exactly to the Kelorn Calendar, save that months are named predominantly according to an almanac for activity in those months, rather than for the Divh. It is common to both the landsmen of these regions, and the civilized myr found there have also adopted a similar year-length where they have not embraced the calendar as a whole. In some places month-names are changed to suit the local industry, but they can usually be explained as early, mid, or late in the given season, quickly and easily to anyone unfamiliar with local variations.